The Webb Telescope captured Einstein’s ring at a distance of 12 billion light years

The Webb Telescope captured Einstein’s ring at a distance of 12 billion light years

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A picture of a distant galaxy was taken by the Webb Space Telescope. It lies at a distance of 12 billion light years and would not be visible to a telescope if it were not for Einstein’s ring. According to ScienceAlert, one of the students who studies astronomy has processed a unique image from the James Webb telescope.

The Webb Telescope captured Einstein’s ring at a distance of 12 billion light years 1

The photograph was of the SPT-S J041839-4751.8 galaxy, which is 12 billion light-years away. It can be seen thanks to the Einstein ring. It appears when light from a distant galaxy passes through a galaxy closer to the Webb telescope and is bent. Thus, although the galaxy cannot be seen directly, due to such phenomena it can be studied.

The glow itself, which is bent, was called the Einstein ring for a reason. In particular, the process of observing distant space objects using other objects that are closer to the telescope is called gravitational lensing. Albert Einstein said that this method exists. Therefore, these rings of light were named after him.

The Webb Telescope captured Einstein’s ring at a distance of 12 billion light years 2

It is worth noting that the Webb telescope took two pictures of the galaxy SPT-S J041839-4751.8. The first shot was not as clear as one might expect. But the second one, after careful processing by an astronomer student, made it possible to see Einstein’s ring at different scales.



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